High Protein Banana Bread

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High Protein Banana Bread

✓ Gluten-Free
✓ Dairy-Free option
✓ Nut-Free option

We are always looking for ways to sneak eggs, nuts, seeds and other lovely protein sources into our sweet treats, to make sure they wont wreak havoc on blood sugars – That’s why we were so excited when we came across this ‘Paleo Banana Bread’ recipe, which has four eggs and almond butter for protein, along with no added sugar! This recipe has proved a hit among our naturopaths and admin team, and we’ve also had some great feedback on it from patients with whom we have shared the link. It also freezes well in individual slices, making it an easy one to pop in a lunchbox or to take to work. 

A high protein, gluten free, healthy and delicious banana bread for you and your family to enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 4 medium very ripe bananas, peeled about 525-575g once peeled
  • 4 eggs ideally room temperature
  • 1/2 cup almond butter (or 140g raw almonds, blended to form almond butter)
  • 4 tbsp butter melted (note: according to some of our patients, coconut oil works well for a dairy-free option)
  • 1-2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup coconut flour (~75g) Note: You cannot substitute desiccated coconut, as it won’t work unfortunately
  • 1 tbsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Pinch of sea salt

Instructions

  • Preheat your oven to 175 degrees Celsius, fan-forced. Grease and line a regular loaf tin with baking paper.
  • Combine your bananas, eggs, almond butter, melted butter and vanilla in a food processor, Thermomix or high-powered blender, and blend until combined (if using a regular mixing bowl, simply mash the banana and stir well to combine with the other wet ingredients).
  • Sift in the coconut flour, cinnamon, baking soda, baking powder and salt, and stir to combine.
  • Pour into your prepared loaf pan, smooth flat and place in the oven to cook for 55-60 minutes, or until a skewer inserted comes out clean.
  • Remove from the oven, allow to stand for 5 minutes, then turn onto a cooling rack to cool.
  • Serve warm, toasted or as is. Enjoy!

Notes

  • To make the recipe dairy-free, some patients have reported success in replacing the butter with melted coconut oil. 
  • To make the recipe nut-free, the original author suggests using a seed butter instead of the almond butter.
  • To freeze, simply allow the banana bread to cool entirely, then slice into pieces and freeze in a glass or stainless steel storage container. You might find it helpful to separate the individual slices with baking to prevent them sticking, if desired. 

Will I get pregnant if I quit smoking?

✅Quitting at least 3️⃣ months before trying for a baby is important to make sure the sperm is healthy when the baby is conceived.

Men and women who smoke take longer to get pregnant than non-smokers. Second-hand smoke is almost as damaging as smoking and women who are exposed to second-hand smoke take longer to conceive than women who are not. The chemicals in cigarettes can cause damage to eggs and sperm which affects a future child’s health.

❓Why❓ Because smoking affects every stage of the reproduction process – in both men and women.

Smoking affects:

🛑the DNA (genetic material) in eggs and sperm
men’s and women’s hormone production
🛑the fertilised egg’s ability to reach the uterus
🛑the environment inside the uterus, where the baby grows.
Research shows that smokers are more likely to experience infertility than non-smokers.

Should I be worried if my partner smokes marijuana?

Men who have smoked marijuana at some point in their life had significantly higher concentrations of sperm when compared with men who have never smoked marijuana, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study, conducted in the Fertility Clinic at Massachusetts General Hospital, also found that there was no significant difference in sperm concentrations between current and former marijuana smokers.

These unexpected findings highlight how little we know about the reproductive health effects of marijuana, and in fact of the health effects of marijuana in general.

📝Analysis of the semen samples showed that men who had smoked marijuana had average sperm concentrations of 62.7 million sperm per milliliter of ejaculate while men who had never smoked marijuana had average concentrations of 45.4 million sperm per milliliter of ejaculate. Only 5 percent of marijuana smokers had sperm concentrations below 15 million sperm per milliliter (the World Health Organization’s threshold for “normal” levels) compared with 12 percent of men who had never smoked marijuana.

❗️Unfortunately, science doesn’t always have the conclusive answers we crave — but given what the medical community does know, for the time being, choosing❌ not to smoke weed if you’re trying to get pregnant is the safest approach to avoid possible health effects on conception and the fetus down the line.

A story by Dr. Gary Levy

Our hearts melt when our patients text us: “We did it! I can’t believe it.”

We want to share a story of one our patient who underwent IVF and other procedures and lost her hope. However this story does have a happy end❤️

🌸Alice tried everything and her hope was lost🌸
By Dr. Gary Levy:

“I would like to introduce to you the story of Alice (name changed for the purposes of this blog post). Alice is a patient that came to us with the diagnosis of unexplained (undiagnosed) infertility. Alice had an evaluation that demonstrated normal ovarian reserve, her AMH was 3.58 ng/mL (the lab norm is from 1 to 7.6 ng/mL), her fallopian tubes were open as documented by a hysterosalpingogram test and her spouse’s sperm evaluation was completely normal. In addition, her male partner had two prior children from a previous relationship. Alice had been trying to conceive for over fourteen months prior to seeking care with us. She underwent a few cycles of letrozole and then underwent IVF and did not get pregnant with a frozen embryo transfer. After seeing her through our, always accessible, telehealth platform, we realized that Alice likely suffers from LPD. We discussed additional testing for PDG monitoring and confirmed our suspicions. We discussed her treatment options, and she underwent ovarian stimulation and progesterone support and got pregnant on her second treatment cycle. She was ecstatic, as her experience at FC allowed her to be successful and receive an answer to the question that has been unanswered for a long time providing much needed closure in a much more affordable manner.”

Can women have children at any age?

In general:

🔸women are most fertile before the age of 30
after 30
🔸women’s fertility starts to decrease
🔸after 35 fertility declines more significantly
by 40
🔸a woman’s fertility is about half the level it was before she was 30.

A study compared women’s ability to conceive, in different age groups. It showed that, compared to women aged 30-31, the chance of conceiving was:

🔹14 percent lower for women aged 34-35
🔹19 percent lower for women aged 36-37
🔹30 percent lower for women aged 38-39
🔹53 percent lower for women aged 40-41 years

Women younger than 30 have about a 20 percent chance of getting pregnant naturally each month. By age 40, the chance of pregnancy is about five percent each month.

So make sure you start your treatment ASAP in case you have infertility.

How do we diagnose PCOS?

PCOS is typically diagnosed via the Rotterdam Criteria which consists of four categories:

1️⃣Irregular menstrual cycles – typically defined as greater than 45 days apart or less than 10 per year
2️⃣Clinical or laboratory evidence of elevated male hormones (hyperandrogenism)
2️⃣Ultrasound findings consistent with polycystic ovaries and the absence of any other cause. The diagnosis is made when two of the three criteria are present. Also, keep in mind this syndrome is a spectrum and will have variable presentation and symptoms.